What I Once Was…

Ran across some old photos and videos. I sure am anxious to get back to being active. I’ve had to learn to take it down a few notches in the last 9 months, which has been humbling, challenging, frustrating, and also refreshing. All in all it’s made me a stronger woman, and I’m grateful for how much I’ve had to transform through learning my own limits. Yet, I can’t help but anticipate the possibilities when I see these:

Love this photo. Definitely my inspiration.

Heartbeats

Whenever I encounter something that makes me scared or nervous, my heart pounds out of my chest. I’m sure it’s not as easily detectable as I think – in my mind I picture my heart actually pulsing to break free from my chest, a lot like those cartoons we used to watch as kids. Despite this, it’s a huge phenomenon for me when it happens. I can hear my heartbeat in my ears, I’m short of breath, and my adrenaline level starts to spike. In the past 30 days, I’ve experienced this feeling five times…

The first came when one of my closest friends asked me if I would compose some music he could use for a project. Who, me? You want to use MY music? That music I don’t dare ever play for anyone else because I’m convinced it sucks?

The next came on December 20, 2015 when I performed in my first pole showcase ever. I knew my dance, I knew my music, I knew my venue…but I didn’t know if I could do it.

The third instance was when it came time to actually give the music I had composed to my aforementioned friend who asked for it. I cringed sending him those samples…

Next, was my first ever Cize class at AvMed on January 6, 2016.

Finally, was my second ever Cize class at Super Saturday on January 9, 2016.

The outcomes?

 

I composed two samples for my friend to choose from and he loved both and will be using them for his project (you’ll hear more about that later).

The showcase was performed twice, back to back on December 20th, and feedback I received was that I looked smooth, strong, and happy. I wrote it down as a win after I nailed my Gemini twice, didn’t knock the chair over, didn’t fall off the pole during inverts, and remembered the moves.

The women at AvMed loved my Cize class enough to want to take a sweaty selfie afterwards.

My upline and spirit animal approached me after Super Saturday and told me to stop worrying about whether or not I could teach Cize because what she saw in me looked professional, energetic, and coordinated.

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Some of the Super Saturday attendees after our Cize workout together. They all said they had a blast. 🙂

The worrying and visualizing of worst-case scenarios was futile. I don’t write these things to brag, but instead to point out what happens when you dare to step outside of your comfort zone and keep on daring to take steps after that. We don’t change by staying the same, ever. We don’t reach our goals by standing still. We also never know what we can and will become unless we make move towards what could be.

After I observed that these heart-pounding moments seemed to be happening more often for me, I told my husband. To my pleasant surprise, his response was this:

“If you’re experiencing those moments that make you nervous more often, that’s a sign that you’re changing for the better. You’re challenging yourself, which is exactly what you said you wanted to do.”

When did my husband turn into a sage? Better yet, when did I decide to make the area outside of my comfort zone my norm?

I can’t pinpoint the exact defining moment, but I do know that in order to have things I’ve never had before, I have to keep doing things I’ve never done before.

 

2016, I hope you’re ready…

Progress Story

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I really hate this photo, but it’s the only evidence of what I looked like 10 months ago.

That’s me at the start of the year. I was fresh off of a life-changing move, in the habit of drinking nightly, and I ate whatever I wanted.

Those weren’t things I wanted, though.
I just wanted to feel happy. I wanted to find a way to get over relocating from the only place I had called home for the past 25 years to a place where I had no friends and no real history.
I wanted my t-shirts to fit again. I wanted to be able to stop alternating the same two pairs of pants because nothing else would zip up. I wanted to look in the mirror and like myself again.
So, I took some chances. I decided to stop playing around with pole fitness and make it my real hobby. I decided to stop cheering and clapping for others who were making transformations and step out and make one for myself.
With the help of the 21 Day Fix, Focus T25, my pole fitness mentor, and my coach, I grew stronger. I gained stamina. I reshaped my body.
I started to love what I saw in the mirror so much that I decided to get serious about helping others find the same change I had. And somewhere along the way between May and October, I lost track of just how I was doing.
I was waking up and working out and making good choices for the most part, but I stopped tracking my own progress. I just stopped paying attention, believe it or not.
…until I stepped on the scale last week and read 147. Then, I went to the doctor four days later and the scale said 144. Yesterday, it said 144 too. I haven’t weighed in at anywhere from 143-147 since before my daughter was born. I’ve also lost a total of 15 inches overall, with 8.5 coming off of my waist, 6.5 coming off my hips.
In other words – I haven’t been this weight and size since 2012.
My transformation story isn’t one of huge loss – I help people all the time who are very overweight and their progress lights a fire in me. I’ve never had more than 15lbs to lose at a time, though, so a shocking physical transformation isn’t something you’ll get from me.
My transformation includes a lot of other great things, though…
Like the strength to do pole climbs, pole sits, elbow stands, dismounts, one-handed spins, and pole ups (kind of like push ups, but gripping a pole instead of on the ground). I can keep up with Shaun T during a live workout whereas 6 months ago, I couldn’t even attempt his home workouts. I know what foods to eat to keep myself full and not add unnecessary calories to my day. I can lift my daughter, who is a toddler weighing in at 44lbs, with one arm. I struggled to carry her with two hands when she was an infant.
gemini

Gemini.

pole sit
I looked away just long enough to forget about my own progress, but I’ve technically reached my “goal”! Now to see what else I can change…

Yeah, I’m a pole dancer.

I suppose this confession has been a long time coming. Everybody kind of already knows, but I haven’t ever truly confirmed publicly that this is indeed what I do – one of the many, many things that I do. So here you go: Yes. I am a pole dancer.

I’m also still a wife, a mom, a professor, a God-prasier, and graduate student. (Yes, naysayers. It’s possible to do all of those at once.)

Let me start from the beginning.

It was October 2014, and I was sitting in my parents’ living room on a warm fall evening. At the time, we were all living with them after moving here from California. My primary job hadn’t officially started yet as I was still in the training phase. Fabian had only been working a couple of weeks. I could feel myself beginning to buckle under the weight of my father’s rules and habits at his home, just as I’d predicted I would after living with him again for a few months. I hadn’t started the MBA program yet, but was slated to begin in a matter of days.

I needed to find a way to get out of the house for a while, alone. I was going stir crazy. Wake up, feed the baby, attempt to spend time with my spouse while watching my parents’ television, in their living room, of their house. Listen to music, but not too loud, because it’s still mom and dad’s house. Go take a walk, but let someone know where you’re going, because you know, you still live at mom and dad’s house. Break. The damn. Cycle.

I started cruising the Internet for deals or events in my area that I could throw myself into. Starting over means everything – new group of friends, new residence, new driver’s license, and new hobbies. Groupon and LivingSocial were my best friends in those days (truthfully, they’re a couple of my mains forever and always, but ever so clearly then) and I was desperately searching for new restaurants, new play groups to take Kennedy to, new ways to connect with this new town I lived in.

I saw a Groupon for “pole fitness” classes offered at a premier studio in Gainesville. The photo had some bright and happy looking chick, doing Lord knows what on the pole, but she looked graceful, classy, and happy. It was $54 for three classes. I figured if I wasn’t feeling it or her I’d just bail after the three classes. I purchased the Groupon and let it sit for a few days before calling to schedule my classes. Even after they were on my calendar, I gave myself permission to back out.

The first night I showed up and met Jacqueline Valdez at her small home studio. No other students attended this night. I’d washed all my lotion off my legs per her rules and made sure to show up on time with a yoga mat in hand. I was wearing what I thought were short shorts at the time and I nervously did floor work with her to warm up my arms, hamstrings, ankles, wrists, and pelvis.

That first class, we started with basic walks around the pole, with stepping and dragging the feet. I looked ridiculous in the mirror, but I tried not to focus too much on how I looked, rather just on what I was doing. She taught me a few simple moves, like 360 turns, none of which I got, and then showed me a few more advanced tricks (advanced by my skill level then) before concluding class with me, bidding me farewell until that Thursday, three days later.

Class two was a lot like class one – me stumbling around the pole trying to keep up with the most basic of moves, her reassuring me that not everyone picks up things easily and quickly. We scheduled one more class meeting to satisfy my Groupon purchase, and I returned the next week. Once again it was just me, and we chatted a bit about the soreness I was feeling in my body from my previous lessons, but Jackie assured me that it was all normal. It was on this night that we stepped to the poles again to run through basic tricks, but something was different for me – I nailed my 360, and I even managed a pole sit. She let me take a selfie in the mirror on this night.

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Pole sit selfie. I only had the bruises for 5 days afterward.

“You’ve progressed,” she said to me with a straight face. Knowing her as I do now, I realize that she was recalculating her plan of action for what she’d teach me moving forward. I identify that as my “hooked like it’s cocaine” moment for pole…

We continued that way for six months with a slight break in between while my husband and I moved out of my parents’ home and into our own place. As we dug our feet into Gainesville as our home, I dug my heels (and ankles and thighs) deeper into pole.

When I first arrived in Gainesville, I was depressed, lost, and conflicted. I had a good life in San Diego, and I left it all behind so that I could bring my family together again. I gave up friendships, familiarity, and my home so that my daughter could grow up near her grandparents and my husband and I could have some backup as we continued to grow our family. In some ways, I view myself as arriving in Gainesville empty handed, and when I started pole, suddenly I had something to hold onto again.

Even more than this, though, is what pole does for my character. Yes, it sculpts my body and makes me stronger physically, but pole dancer Antoinette holds her own much better than non-pole Antoinette ever did. Because pole dancing carries such a negative connotation, the people who do it have to be really motivated to practice it constantly and want to progress in it. The ante is doubled for those who choose to share their craft with the world. Because I know what the majority of the world has to say about my practicing this as a hobby, it truly is something I have to do for myself. For the record: I do not do this for my husband. I do not do this out of rebellion. I do not do this out of desperation. I do not do this because I’m trying to be someone else. I do pole for me and me only. It is my selfish indulgence.

Pole allows me to unashamedly claim the right to be sexy. Men are allowed to be sexy without consequence – nobody throws shade on the male manager that all the females in the office swoon over. Women must always pay for being sexy – in labels, in whispers they think we can’t hear, in missed opportunities to be taken seriously. No thanks.

Pole frees me. ALL of me.

Plus, it was either this or join a fight club, and I like my face too much for that.